Sound The Alarms: Colombian Government Authorizes Land For Fracking

After learning that the Colombian government allotted 43 areas for hydrocarbon exploitation through the controversial fracking technique, an immediate response has been raised by environmentalists and citizens who understand the risks of this technique.

Fracking is not a conventional exploitation technique, it consists of injecting large quantities of water at a high pressure through a pipe (not necessarily vertical) to fracture the bedrock layer of the Earth containing a well of hydrocarbons.

Fracking and the contamination process

Fracking and the contamination process

In addition, the water is mixed with particles and chemical substances that maintain open fractures and cracks so that hydrocarbons can flow and be easily collected.

There is a large amount of adverse effects that are reported due to this practice, mainly because it weakens the layers of rock that serve as supports. Furthermore, the chemicals and particles injected contaminate surrounding aquifers and land, as well as the air that absorbs the toxic substances that are released, and contaminates kilometers of distance.

Non-conventional hydrocarbon deposits in Colombia

Non-conventional hydrocarbon deposits in Colombia

The situation is even worse due to the fact that the majority of Colombian forests that the government tries to dedicate to fracking are found in areas vital to the ecosystem. Seven of the areas make up part of the Chingaza natural park in the outskirts of Bogotá, others are part of the Sumapaz plateaus (the highest plateaus in the world), and others are found in Cajicá, Cundinamarca and Chía jurisdictions.

The Sumapaz plateau is the agricultural breadbasket of the Colombian capital, and the Chingaza plateau provides 80% of water to the capital, playing an important role in the health of Colombia’s main city.

The city of Bogotá and the plateaus of Sumapaz and Chingaza threatened by fracking

The city of Bogotá and the plateaus of Sumapaz and Chingaza threatened by fracking

Thanks to the quick reaction from environmental movements and people who understand the immediate risk posed, a petition has been opened through change.org, calling on citizens all over the world to support the protection of these plateaus. The “Colombian Alliance Free of Fracking” movement sent a letter to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, (read the letter HERE).

River on fire in Brisbane, Australia due to gases leaked by fracking

River on fire in Brisbane, Australia due to gases leaked by fracking

The World Conscious Pact invites everyone to join and sign the petition so that we can stop fracking in Colombia.

Sign the petition, “No al fracking en el páramo más grande del mundo, Parque Natural Chingaza, Colombia” (No to fracking on the largest plateau on Earth, Chingaza National Park in Colombia) on Change.org HERE